Vegetative propagation is a form of asexual reproduction of a plant. Only one plant is involved and the offspring is the result of one parent. The new plant is genetically identical to the parent.

Natural Vegetative Propogation

New plants grow from parts of the parent plant. They include:

Stems

Runners are stems that grow horizontally above the ground. They have nodes where buds are formed. These buds grow into a new plant.

Roots

New plants will grow out of swollen, modified roots called tubers. Buds develop at the base of the stem and then grow into new plants.

Leaves

Leaves of some plants will grow into a new plant if they become detached from the parent plant. Other plants grow small plants called plantlets on the edge of their leaves.

Bulbs

A bulb contains an underground stem. Leaves are attached to the stem. These leaves contain much stored food. At the centre of the bulb is an apical bud. Also attached are lateral buds. The apical bud will produce leaves and a flower while the lateral buds will produce new shoots. As the plant grows and develops it will form a new bulb underground.

Artificial Vegetative Reproduction

Horticulturists and farmers use artificial means to produce plants that are identical to the parent plant. Some of the methods used are:

Cuttings

Cuttings are part of the plant that is cut off of the parent plant. Shoots with leaves attached are usually used. New roots and leaves will grow from the cutting. The shoot is cut at an angle. A growth promoter may be used to help with the growth of the roots.

Grafting

In grafting 2 plants are used to develop a new plant with combined traits from the 2 parent plants. In grafting the scion is the above ground part of one plant. The scion is attached to the stock which is the rooted part of the second plant.

Layering

In layering a shoot of a parent plant is bent until it can be covered by soil. The tip of the shoot remains above ground. New roots and eventually a new plant will grow. These plants can then be separated.